Read: The second machine age

Bought in 2014, right after it was published, I should have read it much earlier. OK, there are still plenty of other books on my to-read shelves that I got before 2012…

Brynjolfsson and McAfee present a compelling (and maybe alarming) case for (information / computer) technology induced economic growth and inequality. We have entered an age of noticeable advancement in computer technology and noticeable impact of computer technology on society. Networked computer technology and globalization leads not just to opportunities in the long tail, an increase in the diversity of goods we may consume, but also to a concentration of the benefits. Competition is not anymore about the absolute (perceived) quality of a good, it is about the relative quality. Only the global relatively best matters in a (digital) economy where local supply is global. A few lucky “superstars” may capture the whole market.

Brynjolfsson and McAfee discuss the chances and challenges, and they offer some counsel. Will the growth be beneficial for all? While the presentation of the data, the discussion of what can and what will happen leaves no doubt (some people will, a lot of people may be harmed), their advice is less convincing. The short term policy recommendations are uncontroversial (and unspecific). Yet, they are less well argued for then all earlier points. This is even more true for the long-term recommendations: Even though I would mostly agree with them; me agreeing with their appropriateness has nothing to do with Brynjolfsson and McAfee’s advocacy. I always liked the idea of a negative income tax; I always would rather tax bads than goods, i.e. I would rather tax consumption than work. I do not agree with the authors’ fondness for MOOCs. I do not like MOOCs; I think they have failed their intended purpose.

So only 2 out of 15 chapters are lacking a little in persuasiveness. That ain’t bad. The other, better argued, chapters may even end up on a reading list for any course that discusses economic growth, GDP, and inequality.

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