Read: David Falkayn: Star Trader

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Reading Anderson’s Technic Civilization Sage makes you feel like a historian who tries to piece together the story of a society long gone by looking at a few personal accounts, by following the exploits, the fates and fortunes, of a few exceptional individuals. There are no records of ordinary persons.

You may get romantic notions of adventures, reckless and successful quests. And yet, Anderson manages to also show the dark(er) side, to hint at the fate of those left behind. That is quite an accomplishment. I still believe that not writing a unified tome (with multiple time lines, going back and forth), not putting everything in one book but having a collection of short stories and novellas is cause for how much better this work seems compared to other, more recent space operas.

The self-contained small(er) pieces are fun to read. You a read a story and you can put down the book feeling (entertained and) satisfied and rewarded. Reading never becomes chore, you do not have to read on so that something …anything happens! Instead a lot is happening in just a few pages. Of course, the frequent re-introductions of the protagonists are repetitive but some new facets are added to the characters every time and so you do not mind.

A final observation, though. While the physics (as far as you can expect from a science fiction novel) and economics seems sound (ok, this is not a textbook) I am not so sure about the armchair sociobiology that Anderson is feeding his readers. On the other hand, given that the short stories and novellas were written in the 60s and early 70s he was certainly was at the forefront of the idea that and how biological factors (like being a herbivore, carnivore, omnivore) determine individual social behavior and society. E. O. Wilson’s Sociobiology was only published in the mid-70s.