Read: Priceless: The Myth of Fair Value (and How to Take Advantage of it)

Just looking at the title and subtitle, it is not obvious that Priceless is another popular behavioral economics book. And yes, I indeed expected something a little bit more (different) than the standard enumeration of cognitive biases, preference reversals, and priming effects that Priceless actually contains.

Though, I have to admit that Priceless also stands out. Additionally, it offers a historical perspective on behavioral decision theory. It is rather focused as it links everything to the perception of prices and choice behavior. And the more than 50 chapters are rather coherent and connected as opposed to some of the other pieced together collections of anecdotes that are currently available.

There is one thing I did not like. In the book, Poundstone makes an implicit assumption – or the original researchers made it and Poundstone just adopted it – prices have an absolute, intrinsic meaning. They have not. In a free market economy prices are just an indicator of relative value (as implied by relative scarcity).

When people are asked to attach values to different objects these values are not even (market) prices. They are just valuations. Therefore, it is absolutely no surprise when people are asked to attach values to different objects that these valuations, i.e. the absolute numbers, differ across different people. And, it is no surprise that when people have an idea about the relative scarcity of the objects that the ratios of valuations are relatively stable over different individuals. If they have no idea, or a different idea due to different environmental cues, the valuations will of course differ. This is how prices are defined, they (their ratio) describe the rate of exchange in a market, they are only unique up to a scaling factor. You need an anchor (a numeraire good) to get absolute prices in some specific units. The reported studies show exactly that. Further, there is no irrationality or cognitive deficit if individual valuations of a non-standardized good (may that be an apartment or an used car) in an experiment differ from a market price and are influenced by environmental cues.

Nonetheless, there are of course many factors that have an unduly influence on individual valuations. Many of these are discussed. What, in the end, makes Priceless a well written, instructive lesson on consumer psychology and initiation into modern price setting strategies.

Some of the material in book was also published in a (short-lived) blog. The author’s heart is, however, somewhere else. The last entry is already one year old by now. The blog thus served only as a pre-release promotion tool.

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