Read: The Tower

Now, with the third installment of Toyne’s Sancti trilogy, things take a strange, unexpected turn. What started as a religious thriller, an esoteric, cabalistic piece of pulp fiction, has turned almost into a science thriller. The religious characters are reduced to nut jobs.

The origin of the story is perfectly obscure and the new character’s plot line is quite dominant, and indeed even more interesting than what happens to and with the old protagonists. Yet, to the original story this new plot line adds nothing, or very little. Rather, it subtracts from it. The concept of the first (oppressed) tribe is diluted, reduced to a free mason lodge. Toyne drifts away from his original idea.

Hence, despite being an entertaining novel The Tower shows that Toyne is not capable of staying within the confines of his own fictional world and produce an internally consistent piece of fiction. Resorting to over-used tropes isn’t a good sign either.

Read: Maximize Your Potential

While each individual chapter of Maximize Your Potential reads rather nicely the whole compilation does not add much. The articles do not build on each other so there is no logical progression, when they are based on research it’s not the author’s and more often than not it’s just one single older study that has been refuted since.

Bottom line: it would have been more reasonable just reading u99’s blog than buying this little book. I consider it a donation.

Read: The Magician King

I have said it before and I say it again: I become increasingly tired of novels with several time lines that in the text are interwoven, even though there would be a perfectly reasonable disjoined sequence of the two plots. There is no need to let the narrative jump from one timeline to the other and back again.

So in the end, The Magician King is two novels in one. Each has its own protagonist. Unfortunately, you have to read both and are constantly forced to switch between the two. Exactly the thing I learned to avoid. I do not want to read several novels in parallel.

Here, I only liked one of the two threads. The becoming of the demi-goddess was much more interesting and suspenseful than the king’s quest. Or in other words, the dark side of magic in Grossman’s novel has a much stronger appeal than the fairy tale.

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Read: Manage your day-to-day

I don’t know whether “Manage your day-to-day” is a best-of of the relevant articles on 99u but it certainly could be. So here is a small collection of articles by various authors on three productivity topics: finding focus, the use of tools, become productively creative.

If you have ever read a productivity blog there will be nothing new. Still, the little book was rather entertaining and a very quick read. Most of the advice is or should be common sense. Nevertheless, I had the feeling that there are also some inconsistencies. Of course, if you have several authors independently writing up some material on related topics and they start talking about their own personal experiences and try to come up with some general advice based on these they will contradict each other in some points. There is no one-size-fits all.

Read: Interesting Times

Rincewind, a Horde of octogenarian Barbarians and their newest member, a teacher beginning a new career. I laughed out loud several times. ‘Nuff said.

Re-reading all the discworld novels was a brilliant idea.

Read: Fallen Dragon

Galactic empires; time travel; genetic and technological (self) enhancements; a romantic, tragic hero; and a strong moral: what is there not to like?

At first it took me a while to see the link between the different time strands; I blame the medium. Reading an ebook is different from reading the printed text. The link was rather obvious, the protagonist at different ages, different levels of experience and maturity.

One aspect that made Hamilton’s Fallen Dragon interesting was the political and economic system in place in this future vesion of our society. Not so different of what we have now, therefore the more credible. Nations states still exist, yet the decisions are made by and within the big companies, “public” services are provided rather by them, consumed by their employees and owners; participation in society and economic and social progress is via stakeholding in a company. Being an owner is having a voice, being able to progress through the ranks within the company, determining one’s own fate, being able to escape. There are, of course, prositive and negative sides to this way of organizing society. Hamilton very frankly spells them out, at least a few of them, without pushing the reader too strongly in a particular direction; embracing or condeming it. After all, freedom of choice and assuming responsibilty can arise from within this systen and from opposing it.

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